Hopping to Iceland


Right now we’re taking a short stop in Stockholm before heading into the cold north in Finland and with a little extra time it’s time for a catch up post.

Back on the 26th of December we headed to the Innsbruk hbf at the early time of 7am, ready for a 15hour train trip to Copenhagen. The pain of the long transits are softened by three things. Firstly having a eurail pass it feels like you’re getting a bargain the more you travel by train (even if you are shattered from travel at least you felt like you made some money out of the trip). Secondly wifi access just makes passing time so easy. Thirdly seeing the countryside roll past and change.

One of the most impressive rail lines to see is supposed to be between Innsbruck and Munich. I say ‘supposed to be’ because when we left Innsbruck it was still very dark. And as we approached Munich a fog had descended. So we didn’t see much of this famous view at all. We travelled on, a little disheartened, but transit excitement was returned to us when we left Hamburg to Copenhagen. We hopped on a diesel train at Hamburg and started watching the King’s Speech just to pass the time on our last leg. About an hour in an announcement came on “In half an hour all passengers must disembark the carriage when the ferry crosses the channel”. We were tired, engrossed in the movie and just didn’t want to pay the notice any mind. So after 15 mins we heard a heavy *THUD*. We threw our eyes outside and saw that our train was getting on a BOAT! I don’t know why it was so exciting then, or now even, maybe it’s just having your ideas challenged of how trains stay on rails and do NOT board boats. I think if I was in a car getting on a Hercules aircraft or getting airlifted by a Chinook I’d have a seizure.  

Anna heading back to the train inside of the ferry

The boat ride was a short 40 minutes and we arrived soon after in Copenhagen. In our three days of Copenhagen the best thing was meeting the people. Not to say that people aren’t friendly in other countries but the Danes take it one step further. We were approached multiple times for strangers making sure we weren’t lost or just wanting to share a bit of Danish history with us.

One time we were just staring at a small building in the middle of a plaza and a store keeper started walking towards us. I thought he was going to start trying to sell us something we didn’t need and wanted to get away but he opened up by asking “Do you know what that building is?” while pointing to the small building we were looking at. “No” we replied. After hearing that he started explaining that it was an old telephone booth setup by a King in the past so the people had access to communication. Then after that brief history lesson he wished us a good day and for us to enjoy our stay in Copenhagen. We were left surprised but pleased by the encounter and I could see how this was the happiest country on earth if everyone was so nice to each other.

We left Copenhagen happy and full from the delicious food (the Danish pasty comes from here for a reason).

Prettiest graveyard you’ll ever see. Also home to Hans Christian Anderson.
Anna waves goodbye to Ariel.
Its alright big guy. I know everyone goes to see the mermaid but that doesn’t mean you’re not special.
Nothin’ like some brain couches for the living room.
Groed. Porridge so good we went there…thrice.

After Copenhagen we hopped onto an afternoon flight to London for a whirlwind of being tourists, festivities, and a jam session with our host. We spent new years eve with a mass of people from Perth which for me was strangely comforting. I’ve never met these people before in my life but after a while it was nice to listen to a familiar accent and having a break in conversation about differences in culture. 

NYE Orphans From Perth on the way from dinner to the countdown.
We had to see a show!
Anna and our Airbnb host Kelvin jamming under a bridge in Camden. The less musically talented stand around and take pictures.

We stepped through London and Copenhagen quickly as our main goal was the get to Iceland and see the Aurora Borealis or the Northern lights. cue *oooooooo* noises. I first heard about Aurora Borealis as an eight year old when we visited relatives in America. My uncle explained to me that it was a group of lights that show up in the sky when sun flares collide with the magnetic field.I don’t remember how I responded but I remembered those words and the eagerness of wanting to see them then. Fast forward 20 years and now I have the opportunity to see them for myself 🙂

We scheduled arriving in Iceland around new year because that’s during the new moon, during the peak of the 27 day solar activity cycle and it was forecast for clear skies. When these 3 conditions occur you should have a good opportunity to see the lights. So when we arrived we immediately booked a tour for the following night. We would ride a four wheeler which would take us out of the light pollution of the city and into the dark cold and clear skies of the countryside.

The following night we were picked up from our hotel and met our guide Mike who took us and our fellow aurora hunters out of the city. On our drive out Mike enlightened us on some Icelandic landmarks, culture (they actually have 12 days of Christmas here! They start on Christmas day and then go crazy with fireworks on the 12th day) and some background on the auroras (from what I understand fast moving particles ejected out of the sun that get caught in Earth’s magnetic field and the slow down of these particles creates the soft glowy lights we know as auroras). Then he tasked us with our job for the next four hours. Sit and stare out the window and shout out if you see green stuff. I looked back at Anna and told her ‘This is just like spotting sharks again’ and memories of how fun that was made the anticipation of lights all the more greater.

We were going to spend the night travelling ahead of the clouds going from dark spot to dark spot to hope to see some lights. At our first stop we saw no lights but I did get some nice pictures of the night sky.

Nothing like snow capped mountains and night skies.

After 15 minutes of watching and waiting in the cold wind the group grew tired of this location and we hopped back into the car to warm up. Then after a 20 minute drive we caught up with another group and our guide decided to go off road to where they were. Unfortunately after getting 2 meters off the road we got bogged. Then our guide tried to accelerate out of the ditch which just dug us further in.

Anna demonstrating how under we are

We spent the next 15 minutes waiting around as our driver and the other car discussed how to get us  . The plan ended up being the other car dragging us back onto the road while two “volunteers” stand in the middle of the dark highway with small flashing lights to warn on coming traffic. And for the large part this worked. Unfortunately in the process of getting us out the other car went down the other side of the road embankment which was then too steep to drive up. There was a lot of face palming. Normally I wouldn’t been as calm about the wasted time but it was an amusing sort of calamity and also we had a guarantee that if we didn’t see it on our tour out we could book another tour again for free.

The other car trying to accelerate up the snowy slope to get back on the road. In the end the car had to be emptied to get out.

The misfortune turned out to be the highlight of the night because we didn’t see any auroras that night. We spent the rest of the time driving to several spots and just shots of the night sky. Which I had a lot of fun doing despite the numbing cold.

A ghostly me and the car
Black volcanic sand beach with chunks of ice debris

Although I was a little sad that we didn’t get to see the lights I still enjoyed the eventful night. After getting back we rebooked our free tour and two days later we were out again. We followed the same routine and we were out on the road. Although I was still enjoying it I could see myself getting tired of the hunt should we fail again.

But it was a different night and we had a different guide, Gilly. After leaving the city, it wasn’t long till he excitedly shouted “Hey I think I see a lttle green over there” he pulled over into a brightly lit carpark and pulled out a tripod and camera for a long exposure shot over the mountains. The rest of us muttered quietly wondering why were taken to a bright car park when we could drive further out. But in just 20 seconds a shot was taken and our concerns were dashed. There faintly in the image of gilly’s camera was the faint green haze of an aurora! The first time I saw an aurora since my uncle mentioned it to me 20 years ago. But it wasn’t enough. I wanted more. Gilly said that it was a 0.2 on a scale of 0-9 so it was very weak. Then he ushered us into the car and drove off determinedly. We drove on roads for half an hour and then spent another half and hour off road. On the way he told us we were going to his “favourite viewing spot because nobody else will be there, getting in the way of your shot and having pointless flashes going off”.

So when we stopped Anna pulled out her camera and took a shot. There it was. Excited I set my own camera and took my own shots. We were at that site for maybe over an hour braving the cold but for such a rare experience on the other side of the world we were going to make the most of it. So that’s it for the aurora hunt for now. I’m ecstatic that I finally got to see one and now I’m hoping I can get a few more glimpses of them before I return home. I’ll leave you with picture and a time lapse I put together.

Double aurorabow!
Double aurorabow!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4b2Qj0UE9ow

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The lead up to Christmas in Austria Part 2 – Innsbruck


Hello! Welcome back for part two! Do appreciate you making the second stop.

Because you have been such a good sport to come back for the second part of my blog post, here, have a Austrian Christmas cookie.

Yum... Christmas cookie for you!
Yum… Christmas cookie for you!

It’s a pretty long post. So make sure you’ve taken enough visual bites of the cookies to keep you sustained for the read.

As you may recall, when Kev recovered from his flu, I started getting sick. So leaving Vienna and traveling to Innsbruck was a bit of a mission for me. I had the chills, the sweats, the sore skin, nausea and a bad stomach. Carrying around a big backpack was exhausting and I just was so over packing it. I tell you, when traveling for an extended time with just a backpack, its always a struggle to get the damn zips to meet, no matter how much stuff you send back or throw out. But I managed and we made it to Innsbruck safe and sound. When we arrived in Innsbruck, being in the middle of the mountains and seeing peaks all around us with the clouds being so much closer, I just could not help but smile and feel invigorated. Looking up and seeing such wondrous, ancient giants so close up was the distraction I needed for me to forget about my physical struggle. It also filled me with hopes of a white Christmas.

View from our hotel room at the Hilton. Mountains everywhere you look.
View from our hotel room at the Hilton. Mountains everywhere you look.

Innsbruck, is the bridge across the Inn River as explained to us by Mathias, our ski instructor. But I’ll introduce you to him later.

In Innsbruck, we enjoyed the Old Town and enjoyed more of the Christmas Markets that were open. These markets were smaller than the ones in Vienna, however, they had more hand made goods and the atmosphere was a lot more intimate.

Kev and the scary huge 'puppet'.
Kev and the scary huge ‘puppet’.
Kev with another huge scary 'puppet'.
Kev with another huge scary ‘puppet’.
Walking down maria therein strasse.
Walking down maria therein strasse.
Hrmmm... fried potatoes!
Hrmmm… fried potatoes!

Skiing

One of the big highlights of Innsbruck was learning to ski! I know that for me, I really wanted to get a good grasp of the sport. I wanted to be skilled enough so that one day if I wanted to take up the cool New Zealand ski trip packages on offer in Australia, I could do it. Kev and I decided to see how the skiing went before booking and paying for multiple days of ski hire and booked the ski equipment and lesson for one day. We had such a great time, and had such a wonderful instructor that we ended up booking two extra days.

Our ski routine was to meet our instructor, Mathias, at 8:30 and be at the slope by 9:00am. Mathias would teach us for four hours and then Kev and I would opt to continue skiing until 3:30-4:00pm. Long, long days.

The skiing around Innsbruck, Austria
The skiing around Innsbruck, Austria

I am in disbelief at how quickly we picked up the sport. First day, Mathias took us to the bottom of Patscherkofel, the base of a blue slope. For the ski noobs out there, there is a grading system for slopes and in Austria the gradings are as follows: green – used for mountain hikers and sledding; blue – easy; red – harder; and black – hardest. I think the interpretation of how hard the slopes are differ depending on where you are, but it appears that universally the colour order are the same, that being green as easiest through to black being the hardest.

The base of Patscherkofel
The base of Patscherkofel

We first learned how to snow plough. Mathias explained that we had to make our skis look like a pizza slice. We then learned how to turn and then after that we were taken up a little higher to implement the basics he taught us. He was really clear in instruction and demonstration and it really helped that it was just Kev and I. First day, we were moving. I was pretty chuffed at how I managed to not fall over once and I realised that skiing was quite a natural sport. As in, you can learn how to ski intuitively. Mathias explained that skiing originated as basic means of transportation in the mountains during winter. Back then, they just attached wooden planks to their feet to ski around and transport hay.

Kev and his skis. Holding them like a pro.
Kev and his skis. First day and already holding them like a pro.

Second day, Mathias took us to another blue slope – Seegrube. This time we skied the whole slope. It was longer than what we had skied the day before and it was really fun. I felt like I had time to change the size of the turns I was making, play around with speed and direction. The slope was enjoyable. I couldn’t help but grin all day. Mathias then took us to try out the half pipe. The half pipe had a very very steep beginning and it was perfect for him to teach us how to descend an incline that was challenging for us. After that, using the edges of the half pipe, Mathias showed us how to turn on the edges. It was thrilling for me. Going up the edge for a little bit then turning adds so much extra speed in the descent. It was thrilling in that I had to really concentrate on keeping my skis together when turning up on the edge as a lot of the time, the way down had uneven snow which would throw you off balance.

Seegrube
Seegrube
Kev on the ski lift
Kev on the ski lift
Going for the half pipe!
Going for the half pipe!
An igloo with a club inside. YUP a club!
An igloo with a club inside. YUP a club!
Going up the ski lift
Going up the ski lift
Looking down into Innsbruck from Seegrube
Looking down into Innsbruck from Seegrube

The third day, Mathias decided to take us back to Patscherkofel and took us up to the very top of the mountain. It took us about 20 minutes using two different chair lifts to get there. When we got to the top, I nearly pee’d myself. We were on top of the world… and man, it was a steep way down. It was windy and I felt as if I was going to get blown off the top of the mountain. However, it was the perfect route to put all of our newly learnt skills into practice. With Mathias leading the way and us following him, it took us over an hour to get down to the bottom. Exhausting! It was the first time in a long time where my legs almost gave way numerous times due to exhaustion. It got to the point that every 10 minutes I would need a break or I would have to start saying out loud to myself ‘legs together’, ‘together’, ‘as one’. For a while they would obey, but near the end they just did what they had to.

The top of Patscherkofel.
The top of Patscherkofel.
Kev, Mathias and I at the top of Patscherkofel.
Kev, Mathias and I at the top of Patscherkofel.

After completing the descent, Mathias said that if we wanted, he could take us to a local cabin for lunch instead of the usual ski restaurant that we had gone to. He said that the cabin served the typical, local Tyrolean dishes and its a place for locals to go, the only thing was that we had to ski there. We were really game for that opportunity, so we took the ski lift up the mountain again. When we got off the ski lift, Mathias effortlessly glided down the mountain, off the ski track and onto a unmarked, narrow path with trees on either side, thinning snow, and a rocky, muddy path before us. It wasn’t too far off the ski slope but it was a bit of a walk when we took our skis off to get there. Once we arrived, I was so happy that we made the trip! It was the sweetest place I’ve seen. First thing I marvelled at was the view of the Alps. Mathias showed us where the glacier was and the way to Italy. The second thing was the cabins themselves. They were made of wood and had a ski rack for skiers and boarders to rest their gear on. There was this wooden trough which had running water pouring out of it and at the edge of the trough, thick icicles had grown from the trough down to the earth. The Trough had an iconic squirrel on it carved out of wood. It was beautiful.

Us at the cabin that Mathias showed us.
Kev having a drink from the water trough.
I love this squirrel.
I love this squirrel.
Looking towards Italy.
Looking towards Italy.
Such a cute set up!
Such a cute set up!

The cabin inside was very, very small. You could probably only squish in 15 people. Once we got a seat, Mathias ordered for us. I had a knodel made out of potato and cheese and in a soup broth (Mathias ordered the same), and Kev had wurst and noodles in a soup broth. We all drank shandy which is a popular drink amongst Austrians to drink after sports. The meal was simple but really nice. It gave us the rest and energy that we needed for the ride down.

Eating, drinking and resting.
Eating, drinking and resting.
Tiny and warm inside.
Tiny and warm inside.

After lunch, Mathias took us back to the ski slope. He stopped and waited for us to catch up to him. Once we were ready he said ‘Ok. So I meet you at the bottom.’ In my mind I was like ‘Woah?! at the bottom?’ Mathias must have seen our surprise and he assured us saying ‘You’ll be fine, you are half way down already’ (If you scroll back up to the last map, you can see Patscher Alm. That’s where he left us). After a big smile and a wave he skied down and Kev and I were left with each other. Nervously laughing Kev said ‘ok, so you first?’ I agreed and turned my skis downwards for the ride home. The ride was exhilarating, and just as tiring as the first. The only difference was that we could set our own pace. We took the breaks that we needed and we were able to navigate our way down the slope fine. Being able to do this gave me a sense of achievement because I never imagined myself being able to ski down a mountain slope by myself without skiing off a cliff.

When we reached the bottom, Mathias was there smiling and waiting for our arrival. I thanked him for pushing us into the deep end because I knew that if we didn’t go down the slope by ourselves this time, we would not be able to go down ourselves the next time. The run gave us the confidence we needed.

An unexpected Ice Hockey game

After our exhausting day, Kev and I realised that we needed to go shopping for food supplies. It was a struggle. We were ‘forced’ out of our room because house keeping needed to get in to clean it. I was a little annoyed as they should have cleaned it a little earlier than 5pm.

When we walked out, I saw that the lights were on at the stadium across the road. I also saw a scoreboard with a count down. ‘No way…’ I said. Kev asked what I was going on about and I replied with ‘Is… is… is that an ice hockey game?’. We crossed the road to have a look and indeed it was! It was Innsbruck v Linz.

Goodbye hunger! We got all excited that we forgot about dinner, and forgot about how sore and tired we were. The atmosphere was contagious! Families attended the games and the kids where donned in the team uniform and with vuvuzelas. The away team, Linz had a very strong support group who were cheering, chanting and antagonising the Innsbruck supporters in passionate, friendly manner. And the game. Oh the drama, the speed, the tumbles, the slams into the barricades.

Our tickets to the game!
Our tickets to the game!
The Innsbruck Sharks!
The Innsbruck Sharks!

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The cutest mascot!
The cutest mascot!

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Christmas

Christmas in Innsbruck was a quiet one. The forecast for the week said that it was to rain for Christmas. So my expectations for a white Christmas was low, however, I still hoped and hoped with all my might that it would unexpectedly snow. Unfortunately, this was not so. So we had a dry Christmas, but it was still a lot of fun!

Our Christmas corner with our Christmas Tree and all the presents!
Our Christmas corner with our Christmas Tree and all the presents!

So that wraps up our time in Innsbruck, Austria!

We are currently in Copenhagen, Denmark and preparing to fly to London tomorrow night. Copenhagen has been wonderful so far! Will post about it soon!

Our footprints: http://spiked.it/uHFQX3J , http://spiked.it/a22bMHP , http://spiked.it/ns4TkFN , http://spiked.it/QDvnsXz

The lead up to Christmas in Austria Part 1 – Vienna


First and foremost, Merry Christmas to all! I can’t believe how quickly time flies and to think that this time last year, I was in Bali, Indonesia with my family dreading the return home and return to the office.

So I am grateful that the ‘Present Anna’ is a lot more happier than ‘Past Anna’. In fact, I think the ‘Past Anna’ would be pretty impressed at the things ‘Present Anna’ has gotten up to; and for that, I am grateful for all the things that have happened in this huge year.

One of the things that Past Anna only dreamt about, was to have a winter Christmas. Present Anna can happily say that she has ticked this dream off the list! Unfortunately, the magical white Christmas eluded us, but that did not diminish the wonder and awe that a Northern Hemisphere Christmas brings. I think of my friends and family back in Australia, enjoying their singlets, shorts, BBQs and beers and I get moments when I miss hitting the beach, the glaring brilliant sun, bringing my speakers and pumping some summery tunes, going out on my $5 body board for awesome cheap thrills, snorkelling at my home reef and eating ice cream and fish and chips after a long day by the sea. Though those moments are fleeting, as I have beautiful things around me to just take my breath away.

Anyways, now moving onto our time in Austria. Because there is so much to cover, I have split my post into two. So this one is about Vienna, and the next post will be about Innsbruck.

Vienna, Austria

After Florence, Kev and I wanted to find some snow and we wanted to go to Austria. We got in touch with Martina and Dan, who if you remember, we met in Rome at Mario’s apartment in Trastevere. Martina and Dan opened their hearts and homes to us! We ended up staying with them for a week and it was so great to get to know them better with Vienna as a back drop!

We had such long and deep conversations about culture, history and people in general over tea, chocolate and breads. We discussed the differences in Austrian German and German German (Martina gave us some really cool impressions), the nature of the close relationship between Austria and Germany (Austria being seen as the little brother of Germany) and how Australians are viewed (Australians are known for travel, and specifically for extended travels when in Europe). We also had some great chats about WWII and the German, Austrian and Australian’s point of view. What really impressed me from these conversations was that all Europeans (not just Austrians and Germans) have such a rich history which involve its neighbouring countries. As such, they are aware of culture differences and the fact that they will need to deal with those differences in their lives. This is an ongoing thing that all Europeans deal with. In Australia, being an island with no connecting countries surrounding us (where another country may walk across our boarders), we are able to live quite autonomously. But as such, we do not really see the need, to learn about the countries and cultures around us. I am amazed at how much someone in Europe will know about the culture, language and history of a neighbouring country. Whereas here I am with English as my first and only language. I mean I make efforts to learn other languages because I’m interested in them, but I will never be as fluent as the Europeans who learn from a young age. I only wish that it was compulsory for Australians to be taught about the culture, language and history of our neighbours in school and university too.

OK, so back to Vienna. Apologises for running off track… again.

Unfortunately, it was in Vienna where Kev and I were both hit by a bad case of the flu. After an awesome run around the Old Danube with Dan and I, Kev started to feel hot, chills and exhausted. He rested in the afternoon, however, he continued to get worse. To the point that his stomach wouldn’t hold food. So we stayed in and rested until Kev started getting better. However, just as Kev recovered, I started getting sick. Same symptoms. This was not ideal. So we did not see a lot of Vienna. We did however, still managed to have some low key fun indoors, and when we did get the chance to go out, we had a blast! Here are some photos that cover what we got up to in Vienna.

Martina, Dan, Kev and I on our first day in Stephansplatz, Vienna
Martina, Dan, Kev and I on our first day in Stephansplatz, Vienna
Outside the Hofburg Palace.
Outside the Hofburg Palace.
Walking down Graben, Vienna. The pedestrian beautiful street.
Walking down Graben, Vienna. The pedestrian street.
Me, Kev and Dan at the Christmas markets drinking Gluhwein.
Me, Kev and Dan at the Christmas markets drinking Gluhwein.
Martina and Dan's beautiful apartment looking out onto the Old Danube.
Martina and Dan’s beautiful apartment looking out onto the Old Danube.
Martina showing us how to cook a traditional Austrian pizza. I forgot the name of it.
Martina showing us how to cook a traditional Austrian pizza. I forgot the name of it.
Kev getting into the dough.
Kev getting into the dough.
Cycling along the Old Danube River to and from the train station.
Cycling along the Old Danube River to and from the train station.
Kev's first proper meal in Vienna after recovering from his flu.
Kev’s first proper meal in Vienna after recovering from his flu – Käsekrainer (cheese sausage) with curry sauce.
Watching a traditional Viennese 'operetta' called Die Fledermaus (The Bat).
Watching a traditional Viennese ‘operetta’ called Die Fledermaus (The Bat).
Running around the Old Danube in pretty cold weather.
Running around the Old Danube in pretty cold weather.

Christmas Markets in Vienna

Besides having a white Christmas, the other thing I really wanted to do was to see the Christmas markets! I’ve dreamed about these for years and I remember wishing that one day I could go to one. Luckily we went to Vienna as this city has so many different Christmas markets! It was unbelievable. When Kev got better, we spent one night exploring them. What can I say? I wish we had something similar back home. But it only really works when Christmas a winter one.

I loved seeing all the fairy lights bringing the usually dark and quiet squares and parks alive. The warm smells that wraps us up as we pass by, warming our numb noses and tingly cheeks. The jolly atmosphere from families walking together, eating together, drinking together and enjoying each other. This was just wonderful.

Vienna's biggest Christmas market.
Vienna’s biggest Christmas market, Wiener Christkindlmarkt at Rathausplatz.
Beautiful handmade decorations!
Beautiful handmade decorations!
We call them gingerbread men. However, Martina and Dan told us that these do not have ginger in them and are called lebkuchen.
We call them gingerbread men back home. However, Martina and Dan told us that these do not have ginger in them and are called lebkuchen.

IMG_3207

SPRINKLES! :)
SPRINKLES! 🙂
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Marshmellow kebab covered in white chocolate and coloured sprinkles! YAY!

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Some fried garlic bread. Don't underestimate its bland looks. This was delicious!
Lango – fried garlic bread. Don’t underestimate its bland looks. This was unbelievably delicious!

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Kev outside the Museum.
Kev outside the Museum Quarter.
More mulled wine
More mulled wine from the Christmas markets outside of the Museum Quarter.
Impractical bear gloves. YUP I bought them. The left one I've named Gunter and the right one is called Fredrick.
Very impractical bear gloves. And YUP I bought them. These were in the Christmas markets in District 7 – the arty area. The left one I’ve named Gunter and the right one is called Fredrick.

See what I mean? Christmas is just magical here! My pangs for a summery Christmas at home are very, very short lived.

Martina and Dan were just wonderful hosts. They allowed us to experience life as a local by showing us the cycle path to the train station, lending us their bikes, telling us were to eat and in general, really looked after us. They even helped us find a doctor for Kev to see! They’ve starting their own Airbnb arrangement for their apartment! So if you ever want a beautiful place to stay in that is on the Old Danube, and a place that will allow you to experience commuting to and from the City centre like a local, definitely look these guys up on Airbnb here : https://www.airbnb.com/rooms/2012889 .

Stay tuned for part two… in Innsbruck!

Our footprints: http://spiked.it/J6bvjSz , http://spiked.it/DYtnSRs