Becoming a branch manager & senior gamesmaster at Escape Hunt


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Seeking happiness!

 

In response to my post about The 5 intangible benefits from the perfect job, here is one of the career options that I had consided. I am writing this primarily for myself as I am a kinaesthetic learner and I learn from doing which includes writing things out in full. But I hope my thoughts may be of interest or help for others who are going through the same thing as I am.


The road to becoming a branch manager & senior gamesmaster at Escape Hunt

As alluded in my earlier post where I considered being an administrative assistant in a interior design firm, despite that position seeming to tick all the things I was looking for in a dream job, there was this deep down, there was a quiet but insistent feeling that was telling me to take a risk with Escape Hunt, a new business that was opening in Fremantle.

And dear friends, I dared to take that chance!

For the past month, I’ve been busy helping the family behind Escape Hunt get the business off the ground. During the times of stress leading up to the opening day, even though I had not signed any contract, employment papers, or received pay for a good few weeks, there was this strong, positive feeling that this was definitely the right path to go on. It was a plunge into uncertainty that I was willing to take. I was ready to make the choice and accept the challenges and lessons that I would learn from the decision if it ended up being a mistake.

However, Escape Hunt has just opened; and let me tell you, so far, this has been the best decision in my life.

When I look over the 5 intangible benefits from this job, I know that it ticks off all boxes:

Pros

  • I use all my prior professional and soft skills experience as a lawyer while undertaking the manager/admin role, but then I am also able to use my people skills, acting, and creativity while being a gamemaster. As such, I constantly feel growth.
  • I like, respect and care about my boss, his family and the casual staff employed. As such, I feel invested in them, their well-being and the success of Escape Hunt. So much so, that I constantly think about Escape Hunt and how to improve things outside of my working hours.
  • The wonderful people that I work with constantly collaborate with me on ideas and issues and I feel safe in voicing my opinions and receiving and giving constructive feedback. This has made me feel worthy and valued, and not like some insignificant, tiny, replaceable clog.
  • When I met for coffee with the owners of Escape Hunt in July this year, I voiced my vision as to how I would like Escape Hunt to be if I worked there. I had played similar games in London and had given a lot of thought about what I would do if I could get a job in a business like that. When I expressed my ideas and goals to them, they excitedly told me that they shared the same dream I instantly felt and I still feel like I belong.
  • Working at Escape Hunt has given me the opportunity to move from north of the river, to a more central area in order to make commuting to work easier, it has been the vehicle that has allowed me to design my lifestyle the way that I want it making me feel free and empowered.

I’ve never felt so proud of what I do. Never.

I was proud that I was a lawyer way back then, but I wasn’t passionate about my job. I had to rationalise to people that I had just met, that my job was awesome. Actually, perhaps I was really just rationalising to myself each time I explained what I did… Whatever it was, the pride was not 100% heartfelt. In fact, looking back now, the pride was more based on the idea that being a successful female lawyer was what I thought most people would be impressed by, and as such, that’s why I ought to be proud of what I did. I didn’t know what I was doing back then. Now I do.

For the Anna today is a completely different creature. I am so happy, and so proud of what I do, that when I tell people about my job, I can’t contain all my ecstatic and passionate energy when I do so. Happiness just oozes out, and I just have so much fun explaining what I do for life.

Ok, so what are the cons?

Cons

There are very little cons, so I’m actually scraping the barrel for these:

  • The uncertainty. This was a bigger issue earlier on when I was still waiting to hear back from the owners about the job. When I was going for interviews and being offered the job for Flight Centre, in the back of my mind, I was still thinking of Escape Hunt, and the uncertainty as to whether I will be offered a job with them did eat away at me.
  • Being a new business, there are times when it’s quiet.
  • I am working indoors for most of the day, and with no windows looking out (as the nature of the games require secrecy).
  • I don’t get an hour lunch break as I used to in the professional world.

To be honest, none of these are huge problems for me now. I’m just happy that I took the risk and rode the wave of uncertainty until I was able to get where I am at this point in time!

What do you guys think?

Have you ever had the choice between the safe job and the job that excites you but you don’t know how it’s going to turn out?

I would love to hear what happened when people chose the safe job?

I also want to hear about what happened to those who took the risk?

What are your thoughts about the perfect job?

Have I got the checklist of the The 5 intangible benefits from the perfect job correct?

Are there any other benefits I should add to it?

Let me know in the comments section!

 

 

 

 

 

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Considering a job as an administrative assistant


In response to my post about The 5 intangible benefits from the perfect job, here is one of the career options that I had consided. I am writing this primarily for myself as I am a kinaesthetic learner and I learn from doing which includes writing things out in full. But I hope my thoughts may be of interest or help for others who are going through the same thing as I am.


 

Anna the administrative assistant?

As part of my search for the dream job, I’ve applied to positions that I thought would use my experience and knowledge from working as a lawyer, but still allow me the time after work to pursue my passions.

Pros

When I looked over the 5 intangible benefits, being an administrative assistant/paralegal/legal secretary sounded like it could tick those boxes.

  • I would use all my prior professional and soft skills experience as a lawyer as well as develop skills in the supportive role and consequently,  feel growth.
  • If I were able to find a team that was involved in something that interested me, being an assistant will allow me to feel invested as I would have helped people achieve something great/complete a project for the greater good etc.
  • By assisting with the above I would feel worthy, as contributing to the company/society would give me great personal satisfaction.
  • If I were to find a team that shares the same visions and goals and one that I get along with and work well with I would feel like I belong.
  • As an administrative assistant, I would have a stable job, pay and hours that will provide me with financial independence and the time to pursue happiness outside of the work hours, making me feel free and empowered.

As such, I attended interviews with recruitment companies like Robert Half and Integrity Staffing, and an interview for a prestigious boutique interior design company in Peppermint Grove (which, I’ve decided not to publicise on here).

Unfortunately, even though I knew that I could be successful, the positions and opportunities offered by Robert Half and Integrity Staffing made my eyes blank over and mind shut down. Perhaps it’s because I knew where those paths would lead to, and I wasn’t ready for that yet.

However, the interview with the interior design company was a surprise.

When I walked into the office where the meeting was held (it was at a marketing company) and I met the owner, there was a completely different kind of professionalism in that room. They were very personable, engaging, relaxed and there was this feeling of freedom of true expression. Perhaps this was because this was in an environment with creative people and being creative myself, I felt like I didn’t need to act too differently to my true self (just a thought).

The work sounded interesting, and the boss was lovely. I looked him up online and saw his work on the Vogue Australia site and was inspired by his vision. I got excited when I received the call for a second interview and with the prospects that I could contribute by helping this team of creative geniuses get organised.

Cons

The cons were little, but they kept at me for a bit.

  • I will be back in the office and I didn’t feel ready to be a 9-5pm office worker.
  • I’ll be sitting in front of a computer for most of the day.
  • Unlike the Flight Centre job, I won’t be meeting new people every day.
  • Work routine could get stagnant.
  • I’ll have to wear professional clothes again (it sounds really silly, but clothes are a huge deal for me, and wearing black on black with a dash of colour where I can squeeze it in, does make me feel like I’m putting on a restrictive costume).

Epilogue

So, what happened in the end?

I had the second interview with the interior design company, and I had been waiting for confirmation of a job position with a new business opening up in Fremantle called Escape Hunt.

I ended up being offered a position with Escape Hunt on the Monday and after an hour of thinking to make sure I had made the right decision, I called up the interior design company to cancel my interview because even though the administrative assistant job could potentially meet all the 5 intangible benefits of the perfect job and the cons were minimal, deep down, there was a quiet but insistent feeling that was telling me to take a risk with this new company.

I’m experimenting, and am ready to make mistakes.

Perhaps this is the reason why I ended up straying away from the administrative assistant path?

If you want to know what happened in the end, you can read the result of my decision in my post Becoming a branch manager & senior gamesmaster at Escape Hunt.

What do you guys think?

Have you ever had the choice between the safe job and the job that excites you but you don’t know how it’s going to turn out?

I would love to hear what happened when people chose the safe job?

I also want to hear about what happened to those who took the risk?

What are your thoughts about the perfect job?

Have I got the checklist of the The 5 intangible benefits from the perfect job correct?

Are there any other benefits I should add to it?

Let me know in the comments section!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Considering a career with Flight Centre


In response to my post about The 5 intangible benefits from the perfect job, here is one of the career options that I am considering. I am writing this primarily for myself as I am a kinaesthetic learner and I learn from doing which includes writing things out in full. But I hope my thoughts may be of interest or help for others who are going through the same thing as I am.


To be or not to be… a Travel Consultant with the Flight Centre Group

I responded to an advertisement for an ‘online travel consultant’ for Student Flights. When I got the telephone interview, I was advised that when I applied for this position I was actually applying for any position available within the Flight Centre Group. Fast forward to today,  after going through a 5 hour induction/interview a few weeks ago, I have been offered a position as a travel consultant at Escape Travel located in a shopping centre 11 minutes drive away from my parent’s home. So here it is, do I want to be a travel consultant?

Pros

  • The content of the work as a travel consultant is travel – selling the idea and inspiring the courage to far away destinations to people. You would think that this is THE perfect fit for me. I love travel, I’ve traveled to so many places (you can check out my posts on under the Travel part of this site)  and I’m great at meeting and talking to new people… especially about travel.
  • There are opportunities for travel consultants to go on ‘research trips’ with other consultants – Hooray!
  • There is a great company culture of celebrating your successes.
  • You have a uniform so you don’t have to worry about what to wear every day and it helps you feel like you belong.
  • HR also makes efforts to place you in a store that is close to your home (which is what they did).

From the sounds of it so far, it meets most of the 5 requirements. So why am I hesitating?

Cons

  • Apparently the hours are long and most of those hours are in a chair behind a computer.
  • There is a lot of over time that is unpaid. Salary is low and with most of your earnings coming from commissions.
  • There will be times when I will have to work weekends which will throw me out of sync with everyone else who works Monday to Friday, who I may want to catch up with.
  • They do not encourage personal travel as much as I had expected, as naturally, the longer you are away from the desk, the less money you will be making, and this is especially so in the first 12 months.
  • I also want to get out of my parent’s home and working only 11 minutes drive away from their place makes the idea of moving out a little counter productive. However, if I am offered a job at another store that is more central and in the area that I would like to move to, then obviously moving out of home is no longer an issue.

Thoughts

The job will use all the administrative, and professional soft skills that I have developed over the years as a lawyer, while using my communicative and personal skills on a daily basis – I like.

But, I want to avoid sedentary jobs where I am sitting in front of a screen all day as I personally need to move a lot of the time (I need to have outside office work/errands as a bare minimum).

I do like the company culture, and I love the idea of being sent on research trips on work time. It means I get to travel while on the job! However, I do imagine that the travel is not the slow, intimate, independent travel that I love, and that it will be a trip of 5 star accommodation and the best tour groups etc – I know I’d have fun, but I won’t be completely satisfied.

I like the idea of belonging and being in a team. But there’s something that doesn’t feel right when I think about going through 2 weeks of training and then being popped out at the end being just like every other new Flight Centre travel consultant.

Perhaps I don’t like the idea of being moulded into something uniform?

Overall, I am just not sure and I do have a niggling feeling in my stomach that does not make me feel elated.

What do you guys think?

Has anyone out there worked as a travel consultant either with Flight Centre or for another company? Have I got my facts right?

I would love to know what other people’s experiences as a flight consultant was/is like. Love it? Hate it? Still work in it?

What are your thoughts about the perfect job?

Have I got the checklist of the The 5 intangible benefits from the perfect job correct?

Are there any other benefits I should add to it?

Let me know in the comments section!

The 5 intangible benefits from the perfect job


The perfect job would be on a pristine beach besides turquoise waters while on a hammock of course.
The perfect job would be on a pristine beach besides turquoise waters while on a hammock of course!

I am in the midst of finding my perfect job.

Yes, I was a lawyer before and no, I do not want to be a lawyer for the time being.

During my year of unemployment, travel and generally just living life, I started thinking and searching for clues to the question of ‘What do I want to do with my life?‘. I no longer wanted to pursue career in law, and after over 10 years of study and work in that profession, I did not know where to start looking. Everything I had done up until that point of leaving my career was, well, building up that career! Do I go back to university and re-train for something else? Do I just try applying to any old job advertised?

What . Do . I . Do ?

What to think about for when you are searching for the perfect job? 

On my travels, I observed and talked to lots of people about their lives, dreams and their jobs. The people I met included marine biologists who lived abroad for months for their research, and then would return home for a few months to their regular job, others were government employees, accountants, engineers, historians, tutors, hosts, tour guides (most of them being writers or historians too), a nurse, a part time dive instructor/ part time traveler, chefs working at michelin star establishments and many more. Each person had their own journey, own lifestyle, and their own goals and values.

From this amazing montage of lives that I had connected to, the stories of those who were happy in their chosen profession showed me that they all had unknowingly gained 5 intangible benefits from their job.

All of them were able to:

  1. Feel growth – The work nurtured their natural abilities and strengths while giving them the opportunity to challenge their weaknesses;
  2. Feel invested – The subject matter excited, inspired or engaged them;
  3. Feel worthy – Completing the work gave them a sense of pride and accomplishment;
  4. Feel like I belong – It had a great work culture, environment and people; and lastly
  5. Feel free and empowered – The job itself gave them the means to have a balanced life style by allowing them to be financially independent as well as having the time to pursue their passions (this part wasn’t necessarily evident in all the people I talked to, but I decided to add it to the list as it was something that I needed in my job).

Sounds simple yes? – Yes.

Is this obtainable? – Yes.

Am I going to test this theory? – There’s nothing better than a little experiment!

Though, from my experience over the past month of job searching, it is actually quite difficult to figure out if a job meets those all requirements as it requires you to constantly check in with yourself and either reaffirms or challenges your personal belief systems (I can’t be a XXXXXX because its below me), values (does reputation override happiness?) and goals (do I really want a family? Do I want to live in a large house?).

Other tough questions include: will this job fulfil requirements 1 to 5 even if the pay is amazing but the hours are super long? Or even if it’s located on the other side of town and commuting there will be 1 hour? How about even if the pay isn’t that great, but the job provides you with an outlet to pursue your passions while on the job? Or, can you compromise on any of these 5 requirements and still be happy?

Hard questions? Well I think so.

Wish me luck for the search for the perfect job!


What do you guys think?

What are your thoughts about the perfect job?

Have I got the checklist of the 5 intangible benefits from the perfect job correct?

Are there any other benefits I should add to it?

Let me know in the comments section!